How do I attract native species to my garden?

by Michelle Lasley

Michelle Lasley is a mother, wife in Pacific Northwest learning to balance green dreams with budget realities.

May 25, 2008

So, going native is always the preferred method. You want to boost your local biodiversity and improve that culture of plants and animals while minimizing the threat invasives pose on your local environment. A good first step would be to contact your local Audubon society to find out just some local birds that you want to see in the area. They might be able to help with identifying plants too. And, if they can help you with the birds, they can help you with which flowers the birds like, which will help you in your backyard.

Here’s a link to our “Backyard Biodiversity” page: http://www.tolmanguide.geog.pdx.edu/backyardbiodiversity.htm. Another nifty site to examine is this site on natives: http://enature.com/fieldguides/. Go to that site and enter your zip code and surf around. And, of course, go back to the U-W Extension site, http://clean-water.uwex.edu/pubs/home.htm, I sent last time. There is a Wisconsin Native Plant source, which I’m sure is similar to Escanaba. Additionally, scroll down and check out their whole backyard, “Rethinking Yard Care” series. It’s really helpful.

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